Adverts: 0161 709 4576 - Editorial: 0161 709 4571
Mail Order: 0161 709 4578 - Subs: 0161 709 4575 - Webteam: 0161 709 4567
Noah Update
Benefits of pet vaccination recognised by independent products’ committee


A NEW report concludes that currently available dog and cat vaccines play a very valuable role in the prevention and control of major infectious diseases and strongly supports their use. The Report was published today by the Veterinary Products’ Committee (VPC) Working Group on Feline and Canine Vaccination into the issues surrounding the routine vaccination of cats and dogs.

“We are pleased that the VPC has arrived at these conclusions”, said David Sutton, chairman of the National office of Animal Health’s companion animal vaccine group.

“The industry has been examining the use of vaccines in cats and dogs for a number of years and this independent expert report concurs with our own findings. It presents the issues in a balanced and scientific manner, which allows informed public debate amongst veterinary surgeons and pet owners,” he added.

One area highlighted in the Report was that of feline injection site sarcomas. NOAH recognises this particular concern and has already been instrumental in setting up an interdisciplinary expert working group specifically looking into this issue.

The Report also found that there is insufficient information to propose booster intervals other than those recommended by the manufacturer and approved by the regulatory process. However, it emphasised the fact that vaccination should be an individual medical decision made by the vet in consultation with the owner and it recognised that the manufacturers’ recommended regimes will be based on a minimum duration of immunity - rather than a maximum.

“NOAH fully supports this approach,” commented Mr Sutton.

“There is much in the Report we need to consider. However, our initial view is that it is constructive and helpful. Vaccination plays a very valuable role in the control of major infectious diseases in cats and dogs and the Report strongly supports its continued use”.