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Lone huntsman delivers petition to Queen

A LONE huntsman rode 250 miles from Devon to London journey over the course of two weeks to give a letter to the Queen protesting about the possibility of a hunt ban.

Rob Williams, 29, hunts with the Tiverton Staghounds on Exmoor and feels so passionately about the future of the countryside that he decided to take a personal stand and go to the highest authority in the land.

"I don't see this being a political issue," he said last Sunday, at the end of his journey on his loyal hunter ‘Dakkers’, which began from his home at Knowstone in Devon in mid-October.

"It is only political because a political party is trying to ban it. I asked myself where one can turn when the Commons shows contempt for ordinary people's way of life. I believe it is the right of every freeborn Englishman to turn to our sovereign. And I wanted her to know the real mood of the country as I experienced it during my horse trip to London."

Mr Williams added: "I never told anyone about my plans or alerted anyone to my journey for two reasons: first, I wanted a genuine reaction as to how I would be received, and second, I was reluctant to attract publicity en route for fear of encouraging the antis."

"One minute I was in the Bishop of Bath and Wells's palace and the next Dakkers was having to make do with calf-rearing meal on a dairy farm," Mr Williams explained. "We were welcomed with open arms wherever we went, and everyone was generous with their feeds for both me and Dakkers."

Stickers and posters from the Countryside Alliance were his sign that they would receive a hearty welcome, and not a single person throughout the journey asked for payment for overnight stays.

Mr Williams, 29, hunts with the Tiverton Staghounds on Exmoor and feels so passionately about the future of the countryside that he decided to take a personal stand and go to the highest authority in the land.

Contempt

"I don't see this being a political issue," he said last Sunday, at the end of his journey on his loyal hunter ‘Dakkers’, which began from his home at Knowstone in Devon in mid-October.

"It is only political because a political party is trying to ban it. I asked myself where one can turn when the Commons shows contempt for ordinary people's way of life. I believe it is the right of every freeborn Englishman to turn to our sovereign. And I wanted her to know the real mood of the country as I experienced it during my horse trip to London."

Mr Williams added: "I never told anyone about my plans or alerted anyone to my journey for two reasons: first, I wanted a genuine reaction as to how I would be received, and second, I was reluctant to attract publicity en route for fear of encouraging the antis."

"One minute I was in the Bishop of Bath and Wells's palace and the next Dakkers was having to make do with calf-rearing meal on a diary farm," Mr Williams explained. "We were welcomed with open arms wherever we went, and everyone was generous with their feeds for both me and Dakkers."

Stickers and posters from the Countryside Alliance were his sign that they would receive a hearty welcome, and not a single person throughout the journey asked for payment for overnight stays.