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Vet treated dogs with human drug


Oldham-based vet Paul Anthony Evans has been found guilty of "disgraceful conduct" by prescribing the banned human drug norethindrone to two greyhounds.

The two dogs, trained by Mrs Elaine Parker, tested positive for the drug after races in Sheffield which took place in February and March, 2006.

Mr Evans, of the Greyhound Consultancy Service, Highlands Road, Royton, denied using the suppressants on the two greyhounds, Checkinpost and Confident Bunny, in order to stop them coming into season during 2005. He also denied informing Mrs Parker that the two dogs could participate in races whilst being treated with the drug.

The disciplinary panel found that Mr Evans gave advice to Mrs Parker stating that the dogs could continue racing whilst undergoing the treatment. At the end of the three day hearing at the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, panel chairman Alison Bruce stated that Mr Evans was guilty on two allegations but due to an "absence of information" he was unaware that the drug was prohibited.

The committee accepted Mr Evans’ explanation that he "mistakenly believed the prohibition did not apply to norethindrone, having regard to its widespread use in racing greyhounds over many years".

Norethindrone, a drug which is occasionally used in some human oral contraceptives, has been banned by the National Greyhound Racing Club. Mrs Bruce said that Evans accepted that he "ought to have known" that the advice given to Mrs Parker was wrong.

Positive

The disciplinary panel also heard that Mr Evans and Mrs Parker had been fined £650 and then £450 as a result of an enquiry by Stewards when the two greyhounds were tested positive following the races in Sheffield.

However Mrs Bruce ordered that, under the circumstances, no further action was to be taken against Mr Evans and he was to "familiarise himself with the NGRC rules and conduct his practice accordingly."

She also emphasised that this was a warning to all greyhound vets.