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Rottweiler rescue story – an apology


Our Dogs would like to correct the background to a story carried in our issue of July 17th and the follow-up story in our issue of July 24th headed ‘Irish rescues taken in by Dogs Trust’.

It has been brought to our attention, and OUR DOGS accepts, that the private rescue organisation based in Co. Wicklow, Ireland, known as ASH, do not engage in the sale of rescue dogs. Furthermore payments made to their driver are strictly to cover the transportation costs from Ireland to the UK.

ASH also point out that they use safe drop off/collection points and not busy motorway junctions as stated in the articles. They further point out, and OUR DOGS accepts, that they have a strict policy on the identification by rescue representatives of the dogs prior to handover, with each dog’s papers being handed over on collection.

In the specific case of the two Rottweilers referred to in the July 17th article, OUR DOGS accepts that it was in fact the driver from ASH who put the dogs’ welfare first in all respects, and it was he who did not wish to return them to Ireland and agreed to release them without payment of the transport cost by the UK Rescuer.

In our follow up article published on July 24th, it was suggested that ASH collects dogs from pounds and brings them directly to the UK. This is not correct, as they only transport dogs with a medical history and vaccination

certificates. Dogs collected from pounds by ASH are subject to a 2 week quarantine period during which vaccinations are given as well as medical care where required.

OUR DOGS apologises to ASH for the factual inaccuracies and misrepresentations contained in the articles published on 17th and 24th July and it regrets any upset, embarrassment or damage to
reputation that was caused to the organisation or its owners, Remi and Helena Le Mahieu, by reason of these inaccurancies.

ASH is an established and well respected welfare centre for animals in Ireland. It is a private non-profitmaking entity which can house up to 200 animals at any one time. It focuses its efforts on rehabilitating, stabilising, socialising, re-homing and caring for each animal it receives in. It benefits from a small amount of government funding and has to raise more than €200,000 through fund raising efforts to keep the centre going.


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